Sunday, 31 January 2010

Camouflage Scarf

182-8299_IMG
Crossed DC
The crossed dc is worked over an area of two stitches. To begin, skip the next stitch. Yarn over the hook, with the hook ready to begin making a double crochet in the following stitch.
Make a double crochet in the stitch that follows the skipped stitch.
Making a double crochet in the stitch that was skipped: Cross the hook in front of the dc just made and, with the working yarn strand in the back, pull the strand through the skipped stitch and pull it to the left of the dc-just-made, so that the first part of the dc being made in the skipped stitch wraps across the post of the dc-just-made. Next, yarn over the hook, pull yarn through two loops, yarn over hook again and pull through the last two loops to complete the dc.
182-8297_IMG
182-8298_IMG
Materials: Camouflage print DK 100g, 4.5mm hook, darning needle.
Pattern: ch 31,
Row 1: sc to end,
Row 2: ch 2, sk 2 sc, 1 dc into 3rd st, 1 dc into 2nd sk st,* sk 1 st, 1 dc into 2nd st, 1 dc into sk st,* repeat to end.
All subsequent rows worked as Row 2. 
Repeat until desired length is reached and break off yarn.
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central

Tuesday, 26 January 2010

Boys Camouflage Wrist Cuffs

182-8300_IMG 
This Pattern is worked in post-stitch ribbing in the round. See notes below.
clip_image001
Work 1 front post double crochet (FP dc) around the post of the next double crochet.
clip_image002
Work 1 back post double crochet (BP dc) around the post of the next double crochet.
Alternate these two stitches all the way around.
Materials: 20g Camouflage print DK yarn, 4.5mm hook
Pattern:
Ch 27, join with sl st to form circle.
Rnd 1: ch1, sc all around and join with sl st.
Rnd 2-10: work in post stitch ribbing (as above) for eight rows, begin each round by ch 2, complete each round with a slip st.
Break yarn off and sew all ends in.
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central

Monday, 25 January 2010

Thing A Day 2010


Thing-a-day is a yearly creative sprint where participants commit to creating one new thing a day and post it on a collective blog. 2010 is thing-a-day's fourth edition and the first to run on Posterous.
Click here for all the info.
Well I’m registered, and at this point, raring to go. Most of the project will be posted on Create A Blog Dialogue.
Please feel free to follow, participate or encourage.

Thursday, 21 January 2010

The Queen Victoria Crochet Scarf Pattern

One of the Original Scarves made by Queen Victoria.
The Queen's Scarf of Honour
One of eight scarves Queen Victoria crocheted for presentation to members of her forces fighting in South Africa. This is the scarf awarded to Private R.R. Thompson on display at the Canadian War Museum.
In the last year of her long life, Queen Victoria crocheted eight scarves for presentation to members of her forces fighting in South Africa. Four were earmarked for members of colonial units, with one each going to "the most distinguished private soldier" serving in the forces of Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The other four went to members of the British regular army. The Canadian scarf was awarded to Private R.R. Thompson for his actions in going to the aid of wounded comrades at Paardeberg on 18 and 27 February 1900.
With the passage of time, awareness of the scarf faded from Canadian memory. In 1964 Bombardier Kenneth Richardson, of the Royal Canadian Artillery, located the scarf with Thompson's family in Ireland. It was returned to Canada by Thompson's nephew in 1965, and has been on display at the Canadian War Museum ever since.
For further information click here.
182-8291_IMG This is my version of the scarf – albeit minus the tassels and in my mind a more appealing colour. I decided to create and document this pattern as it doesn’t seem to be documented elsewhere on the internet and could be a valuable educational resource for encouraging children to learn crochet :-)
Skill Level: Easy
Materials: 100g DK or worsted weight wool, 6mm crochet hook and darning needle.
Measurements: 8.25” x 54” approx.
Pattern:
ch 27 sts + 2
Row 1:  work three dc into 5th ch from hook, *sk 3 ch, work a dc three times into next ch*, ** rep to end.
Row 2: ch 3, *work 3 dc under next sp between triple dc cluster*, rep to end
Repeat row 2 until 82 rows are complete.
If adding tassels then on the original Queen Victoria crochet scarf they were 4” in length.
To Finish: darn all ends in.
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you
Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central
For other exclusive patterns and my handmade creations please click here.

Wednesday, 20 January 2010

Wednesday Night Project 200110 – Burns Night Supper 25-01-2010.


Celebrating Robert Burns
Burns Night, at its best, is a time to be hopeful, striking a balance between life's joys and sorrows. If Shakespeare's poetry scales the heights of poetic achievement, Robert Burns' poetry sweeps the broad rolling plain of common humanity, with all its triumphs and disasters. He writes about hope, courage and the joy of being alive in a world of terror, darkness and fear.
Burns Night recipes
Orkney clapshotIf you're making your own haggis, you'll have to start preparation a day in advance. For a variation on the Bashed neeps, you can make Orkney clapshot (which is often served with haggis). Mix the mashed seasoned swede with an equal quantity of mashed potato and beat well until smooth. This mixture can be put into a pie or gratin dish, thickly covered with grated cheddar cheese and baked in the oven, or under the grill, until browned.
Click here for my own vegetarian haggis recipe.
Click here to make your own haggis.
Click here for a bashed neeps recipe.
Address to a Haggis
Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o the puddin'-race!
Aboon them a' ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy of a grace
As lang's my arm.
The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o need,
While thro your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.
His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An cut you up wi ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin, rich!
Then, horn for horn, they stretch an strive:
Deil tak the hindmost, on they drive,
Till a' their weel-swall'd kytes belyve
Are bent like drums;
The auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
'Bethankit' hums.
Is there that owre his French ragout,
Or olio that wad staw a sow,
Or fricassee wad mak her spew
Wi perfect sconner,
Looks down wi sneering, scornfu view
On sic a dinner?
Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
As feckless as a wither'd rash,
His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
His nieve a nit:
Thro bloody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit!
But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
He'll make it whissle;
An legs an arms, an heads will sned,
Like taps o thrissle.
Ye Pow'rs, wha mak mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill o fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
That jaups in luggies:
But, if ye wish her gratefu prayer,
Gie her a Haggis!
Robert Burns

Tuesday, 19 January 2010

Quick Easy Lacy Belt Crochet

1828287_IMG_thumb2

Thank you to Patti for editing my picture :-)

Firstly I apologise for the quality of the photograph. Quality light levels in Scotland are like hens teeth! I will update the photo as soon as I am lucky enough to experience the sun.
Materials:
50g DK yarn, 6mm hook, tapestry needle.
Measurements: 2.5” x 46” approx tassel’s are longer.
Ch 121
Row 1: sc into the first 9 ch, *sc into next ch, htr into next ch, dc into next ch, tr into next ch, dc into next ch, htr into next ch*, **rep 17 times, sc into final nine ch.
Row 2: ch 1, sc into each st to final st, work 3 sc into last stitch (turning to work on the opposite side of the foundation ch).
Row 3: sc into the first 9 ch, *sc into next ch, htr into next ch, dc into next ch, tr into next ch, dc into next ch, htr into next ch*, **rep 17 times, sc into final nine ch.

Row 4: ch 1, sc into each st to end.
Row 5: ch 1, sc into the next 8 sts, *ch8, sk 7 sts, sc into next st,*, **rep to final 8 sts, work 1 sc into each st to end.
Row 6: ch 1, sc into each st and each ch to end.
To finish: Darn all ends in and cut 20 lengths of 12” of yarn, using crochet hook and five strands of yarn attach a tassel to each end of the belt.
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you
Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central
For other exclusive patterns and my handmade creations please click here.

Freeform Crochet Necklace

Manos del Uruguay – Classica wool
100%  PURE WOOL
HAND SPUN & KETTLE DYED
in Uruguay by a non-profit organization, which assembles over 400 artisans in co-operatives, scattered throughout the countryside. The aim of the organization is to bring economic and social opportunities to rural women.
182-8266_IMG 182-8265_IMG 182-8262_IMG 182-8267_IMG

Saturday, 16 January 2010

Turtleneck Ribbed Crochet Cowl – Haiti Earthquake Appeal

182-8256_IMG
I have just produced this crochet pattern for a turtleneck ribbed cowl. The pattern is available to purchase through my Folksy store by clicking here.
I have designed this pattern in order to raise some money for the Haiti Earthquake Appeal please support me in this by purchasing the pattern here.
Thank you.
Alternatively please donate directly to DEC
We have to make the world a better place :-)

Friday, 15 January 2010

Haiti Appeal

 A couple looks over hundreds of earthquake victims at the morgue in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010. Photo: AP

Donate Now

Unicef - Donate Now

Red Cross - Donate Now

DEC - Donate Now

Haiti appeal: Red Cross raises £500,000 in 24 hours

14 Jan 2010 12:20:00 GMT

Source: British Red Cross Society - UK

Reuters and AlertNet are not responsible for the content of this article or for any external internet sites. The views expressed are the author's alone.

216872 logo

14 January 2010

An outpouring of public generosity for people devastated by the Haiti earthquake has helped the British Red Cross raise half a million pounds in the first 24 hours of launching its appeal.

Around three million people live in the area of Haiti worst hit by the quake and many have lost family, homes, livelihoods and essential services. Red Cross volunteers are assisting the injured and supporting hospitals struggling to cope with this emergency.

The earthquake struck on Tuesday 12 January at 4.53 pm local time (9.53 pm GMT). It hit the capital Port-au-Prince and other areas nearby. More than 20 aftershocks have continued wreaking destruction. Government buildings have collapsed including the presidential palace. The Haitian Red Cross headquarters and United Nations buildings have also sustained damage.

Aid agencies

The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) – which in major crises brings together 13 leading UK aid agencies to raise money to help save lives and rebuild shattered communities – is now launching an appeal.

Pete Garratt, British Red Cross disaster response manager, said: "The full extent of the devastation is not yet clear, but this is a densely populated region and up to three million could be affected. It's important that we all come together to raise as much money as we can.

"There are currently no shelters for people and they are staying in the streets. They're frightened by the aftershocks and the situation is very tense. Red Cross staff and volunteers are on the scene carrying out search and rescue, providing first aid and distributing relief. We already had pre-positioned emergency stocks in Haiti and additional aid is on its way and will land within the next few hours."

Urgent needs

One of the main hospitals in the capital has collapsed and two hospitals in Turgeau are destroyed. Other hospitals are overwhelmed with the injured. Electric and telephone lines as well as water mains have been destroyed in the areas of Turgeau, Pakot and Canape Vert. Many roads are destroyed.

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has deployed a field assessment team to assess emergency and early recovery needs, including the restoration of livelihoods and permanent shelter.

The Federation has also deployed a number of emergency response teams who will set up a mobile field hospital, provide clean water and distribute relief.

Contacting family

The International Committee of the Red Cross has set up a special website to help thousands of people within Haiti and abroad who have lost contact with their loved ones. The most urgent needs at this time are search and rescue, hospital care, emergency health, clean water, emergency shelter and telecommunications.

Along with the generosity of the public, the Vodafone Foundation immediately made a £25,000 donation to the appeal, Tesco made a donation of £50,000 and the Freemasons' Grand Charity also quickly pledged their support with a donation. However, the sheer scale of this disaster means much more will be needed.

Please give generously to the British Red Cross Haiti earthquake appeal and show your support for families who have lost everything.

In the event that we raise more money than can be reasonably and efficiently spent, any surplus funds will be used to help us prepare for and respond to other humanitarian disasters either overseas or here in the UK

Reuters

Thursday, 14 January 2010

Fiesta Hyperbolic Scarf - Crochet





Materials:
7mm crochet hook, 50g yellow DK yarn, 150g patterned DK yarn.
Skill Level: Easy
Measurements: 3” x 60” approx.
Note: Work rows 1-4 in double stranded yarn by mixing yellow with 1 ball of patterned DK yarn. Work rows 5,6,7 with two strands of patterned DK yarn.
Pattern:
ch 131 st, turn
Row1: sc into each st, turn
Row2: ch1 inc by working 2 sc into 1st st and every 5th st to end, turn
Row3: ch 1 inc by working 2sc into 1st st and every 4th st to end, turn 
Row4: ch 1 inc by working 2sc into 1st st and every 3rd st to end, turn 
Row5: ch 1 inc by working 2sc into 1st st and every 2nd st to end, turn 
Row6: ch 1 inc by working 2sc into every st to end, turn 
Row7: ch 1 sc into each st to end.
Break off yarn and sew all ends in.
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you
Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central
For other exclusive patterns and my handmade creations please click here.

Wednesday, 13 January 2010

The History of Shawls – Wednesday Night Project 130110

 [1717144_IMG6.jpg]
The word shawl, derives its origin from the Persian 'shal', which is of ancient origin not only in India but in the Middle East as well. Shawls give warmth and have been used as a protective garment against severe cold since ancient times.
171-7162_IMG Another Comfort Payer shawl please click here for other handmade shawls etc.
The exact origin of shawl is not known. However, people were using shawls since a very long period of time. The Jewish men wore a shawl named "tallit" during prayers and ceremonies since long. In the first decade of the nineteenth century, silk shawls with fringes were available in China. These shawls with more embroidery were also popular in Europe and America during 1820s and were known as China crepe shawls. In Spain, the shawls were termed as "mantons de Manila" because they were brought to Spain from China via the Manila port. Infact, in Spain, shawls were a part of gypsy dress, known as "gitanas".
Shawls were also part of folk dress in various places like Germany, the Near East, Latin America, Andalusia and Madrid during the same period. Indian shawls became very popular as high-fashion garments in Western Europe in the early- to mid-nineteenth century.
181-8180_IMG
Persian shawls were also world famous for their intricate designs and patterns. In fact, the word "shawl" itself is of Persian origin. Persian shawls were mostly manufactured from highly esteemed wool from Kirman goats. Apart from wool, silk and cotton were also used for weaving shawls of exquisite designs in Persia. Shawls were produced mainly in Kirman and in Mashhad in northeastern Persia. Besides, Tabriz town was also known for producing shawls of various types. Persian shawls competed in the market with shawls woven on jacquard looms in Russia and Europe.
Russian shawl history is a blend of oriental and European culture. It is said that Russian trade with Persia centuries ago resulted in the popularity of Persian shawls among Russian women. This in turn, initiated the process of shawl weaving in Russia. But eventually, the ornamental Russian shawl industry came up with innovative designs and finishes and became popular worldwide. Nepal is also known for producing Pashmina shawls of good quality since long.
174-7493_IMG
Shawls were popular amongst Indians in variety of forms since ancient times. The history of shawl weaving is closely linked to the history of woolen textiles in India. Kashmir valley of India is known for weaving shawls from Pashmina wool. Among all other shawls produced in India, Kashmiri shawls are known for their softness, warmth and traditional designs. The intricately embroidered and hand woven shawls from Kashmir are popular throughout Europe, Persia and other western countries since years.
166-6632_IMG

Pashmina is considered as the softest, most luxurious and best wool in the world. The warmest and most luxurious of all the animal fibers, the wool basically comes from the cashmere hair of a Central Asian Species of the mountain goat, Capra hircus, also known as shawl goat. The fiber was also obtained from goats in Tibet and Central Asia. Even in modern India, shawls are a part of traditional male costumes in the colder regions of the Himalayas.
The Indian shawl industry got international recognition during the British rule in India. Apart from Kashmir, shawl making also spread its wings to Punjab, West Bengal, Gujarat and some other north eastern states in India.
Here is another link to a lovely vintage shawl pattern and a fabulous blog.

Tuesday, 12 January 2010

Man’s Easy Striped Scarf - Crochet




This pattern is really very simple for a basic stripey scarf. The choice of colours can be changed to make it into a feminine girly scarf, but I find men’s patterns are very under represented.



 
Materials: 5.5mm hook, 150g various colours of DK yarn. I used 7 different colours -Brown, Mustard, Rust, Royal Blue, Pale Blue, Jade, brown/grey mix.
Measurements: 9” x 52” approx
Skill Level: easy
Pattern:
Chain 150
Work 31 rows changing colour for every row. All rows ch 1 and work sc into all sts to end, turn, change colour and repeat.

This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.thesunroomuk.blogspot.com/ Thank you
Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central
For other exclusive patterns and my handmade creations please click here.

Monday, 11 January 2010

Lacy Seed Stitch Scarf

181-8173_IMG 
This is a pattern for a quick and easy scarf that knits up to look very lacy and effective. The needles used are oversized in comparison to the 4ply yarn thus giving the lacy effect.
Skill Level: Easy
Materials: 150g 4 ply sock wool, 7mm needles.
Cast on 31 stitches.
All rows: k1, pl to end.
Repeat until desired length is reached, cast off, sew all end in.
181-8171_IMG
This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central or Knitting Pattern Central

For more exclusive patterns and my handmade creations please click here.

Saturday, 9 January 2010

World’s Biggest Crochet Hook

Lady using her body to crochet giant yarn
Crochet fans will be amazed at this art installation recently created at the Turnpike Gallery in Leigh, Greater Manchester. Using her entire body as the crochet hook, the artist has created a huge pod big enough to sleep in.
The artist is known as rockpool candy, and is what she calls a fibre activist. The giant formation is crocheted from thin plastic tubing showing that you really can crochet from just about anything.  The crochet hook is, in fact, the artist's entire body.
This is probably the craziest crochet you will ever have seen. It makes you realise you can crochet with just about anything.
Why stop at dainty crochet, when chunkier yarns give fantastic effects too. As long as you have a big enough hook, you can crochet with anything. Try Rowan Biggy Print with a 20mm hook. Move over traditional, and make way for experimental crochet.

Source: Coats Crafts UK

Friday, 8 January 2010

January Prayer Shawl Crochet



It’s been so ridiculously cold this past week that I decided to create a shawl that is warm and evocative of spring bulbs emerging. This shawl is shaped in such a way that it fits snugly on and around the shoulders giving the feeling of warmth, security and a fabric cuddle.
Materials:
300g Caledon Hills Worsted Wool – 881 Goldenrod
7mm crochet hook
Pattern:
ch 70 (+2) counts as first hdc
Row 1: hdc into each ch to end
Row 2: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st and last st, dc into all other sts
Row 3: (Inc Row) ch 1, work 2 hdc into 1st and last st, hdc into all other sts
Row 4: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st st and every 10th st, work one dc into all other sts
Row 5: (Inc Row) ch 1, work 2 hdc into 1st and last st, hdc into all other sts
Row 6: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st and last st, dc into all other sts
Row 7: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st st and every 10th st, work one dc into all other sts
Row 8: ch 1, hdc into all sts
Row 9: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st and last st, dc into all other sts
Row 10: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st st and every 10th st, work one dc into all other sts
Row 11: (Inc Row) ch 2, work 2 dc into 1st and last st, dc into all other sts and ch between each dc
Row 12 – 14: (Dec Rows) decrease at both sides on each row by ch 3, work 1 dc into 2nd ch sp at beg and end of each row. Continue to work 1 ch, 1dc throughout.
Row 15 – end: (Dec Rows) Continue to decrease at each end of every row and work straight dc without ch in between sts.

This pattern is offered and made available for personal use only. If you wish to reproduce this in any way please contact me or make sure that reference is made to the original author’s blog http://www.goodtimesithinkso.blogspot.com/ Thank you
Crochet Conversion Chart US/UK
International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart
I hope you enjoy using this pattern and if you are looking for other free patterns please visit Crochet Pattern Central
This shawl may be available in my store by clicking here.

Thursday, 7 January 2010

Happy Birthday Mr Sunroom

170-7086_IMG

170-7085_IMG

Yes this is him in the cherry tree – no on the cherry tree doing a little pruning last year! Happy Birthday oldie!

A quick note to let you know that fellow blogger TillyRose is having a fabulous happy giveaway on her blog Click here to enter

International Yarn Weight Conversion Chart

 

US UK Australia Suggested Needle (mm)

Laceweight

2ply 2ply 1.5–2.25 mm
Light Fingering 3ply 3ply 2.25— 3 mm
Fingering 4ply 4ply 2.25— 3.25 mm
Sport Light DK 5ply 3.25— 3.75 mm
DK/Light Worsted DK 8ply 3.75— 4.5 mm
Worsted No equivalent, suggest Aran   4.5— 5.5 mm
Aran Aran   4.5— 5.5 mm
Bulky Chunky 12 ply 5.5— 8 mm
Super Bulky Super Chunky   8 mm and up

Click here for crochet abbreviations Conversion Chart

Wednesday, 6 January 2010

Wednesday Night Project 060110

'The Little Girl's Knitting and Crochet Book', front cover, 1915
What Happens When We Wind!
There's nothing wrong about the wool
When first it is untied;
The strands are lying evenly
And neatly, side by side.
But you should see what happens when
We start to wind that wool!
It gets in knots that won't come out,
No matter how we pull!
It keeps on slipping off our hands;
It tangles left and right;
And long before we're half-way through
It's in a dreadful plight!
The ball jumps down to find the cat,
And then it wanders round
And ties itself to table legs,
And things upon the ground.
And while we're looking for the ball,
Our Mother says, 'Oh dear!'
'You've got it in an awful mess!
'You'd better bring it here.'
V & A - Knitting Patterns for Children click here.
The V & A website has an array of resources and free patterns for knitters. I particularly like the 1940’s vintage patterns that are available for download by clicking here
'The balaclava helmet', from Essentials for the Forces, 1940s.
'Essentials for the Forces', Jaeger, 1940s.
'When You're "Off Duty"', from Woman's Weekly, 1940s
'A Happy Thought', from Woman's Weekly, 1940s

1940s Patterns to Knit

The 1940s in Britain was a high point for hand knitting. Women on the home front could make a contribution to the war effort by knitting for the troops using patterns that were often given away free. Many specialised patterns developed such as the balaclava helmet with ear flaps for use in telephone operations or the mittens with a separate forefinger for firing a trigger in the cold. Once the war was over both clothing and knitting wool were still rationed but people turned to knitting as a cheap way to enhance their wardrobes. Fine wool and pretty lacy patterns became fashionable.
The Archive of Art and Design holds a collection of knitting patterns from which a small selection has been made. They fall into two groups: wartime knitting and general knitting.

Knitting in the Archives

The Victoria and Albert Museum runs the Archive of Art and Design from a base in west London. The Archives collects documents related to firms and individuals who worked in the creative industries. They have a small collection of documents from people who designed knitting or who taught it or practiced it. The collection is strong on people active in the mid 20th century.

  • Eileen Calvert, knitter and needlewoman: collection, about 1930-86.
    AAD/1993/10


  • Elizabeth Davenport, knitwear designer: papers, 1937-88.
    AAD/1991/8


  • Ephemera Collections: patterns for crochet, embroidery, knitwear and sewing, 1885- about 1979.
    AAD Ephemera


  • Ethel Garnham, crocheter, knitter and seamstress: collection, about 1930-51.
    AAD/1991/5


  • Ramah Judah, embroiderer and knitter: collection, 1918- about 1949.
    AAD/1990/3


  • Knitting Patterns: about 1939- about 1959.
    AAD/1990/11, AAD/1995/34


  • Eve Sandford, knitting designer: albums, 1961-9.
    AAD/1988/6

Contact Details
Blythe House, 23 Blythe Road, West Kensington, London, W14 0QX, United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)20 7603 1514
Email: archive@vam.ac.uk
Visit The V & A website - Knitting Section here