Wednesday, 28 May 2014

New Carousel Crochet Granny Square Blanket

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Tuesday, 27 May 2014

Noro Silk Garden Half Granny Square Shawl Crochet Pattern








Materials: 6mm hook,
250g of Noro Silk Garden yarn
Measurements: 52” wide x 27” long

Pattern:
Ch 6, join with sl st
Row 1: ch 3, work 2dc into ring, ch 2, work 3 dc into ring, turn.

Row 2: ch 3, 2 dc in 1st st, ch 1, [3 dc, 2 ch, 3 dc] corner formed, ch 1 3dc into final st, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, 2dc in 1st st, *1 ch , 3dc in next ch sp*, ** rep to corner, [3 dc, 2 ch, 3 dc], *1 ch , 3dc in next ch sp*, ** to final st, work 3dc into final st, turn.
Rows 4- 29: work as row 3.
Finishing:
Darn all ends in, work a row of edging around both lower sides of the shawl here I used my easiest ever crochet edging.
















Monday, 26 May 2014

Granny Square Scarf–Free Crochet Pattern

Image of Multicolored Scarf

Lion Brand® Heartland
Pattern #: L20658

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SKILL LEVEL:  Easy

SIZE: One Size

About 6 1/2 x 104 in. (16.5 x 264 cm)

GAUGE:

1 Granny Square = about 6 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (16.5 x 16.5 cm).

BE SURE TO CHECK YOUR GAUGE. When you match the gauge in a pattern, your project will be the size specified in the pattern and the materials specified in the pattern will be sufficient. If it takes you fewer stitches and rows to make a 4 in. [10 cm] square, try using a smaller size hook or needles; if more stitches and rows, try a larger size hook or needles.

NOTES:

1. Scarf is made from 16 Granny Squares sewn together.
2. Each Granny Square is made with 6 different colors. Follow Color Sequences, changing colors every rnd. Work over yarn ends as you go, or if you prefer, weave them in at the end.
3. Border is crocheted around the outside edge of completed Scarf.

COLOR SEQUENCES
Square 1:
Work 1 rnd each with J, K, F, B, H, G.
Square 2: Work 1 rnd each with M, D, B, L, K, C.
Square 3: Work 1 rnd each with B, J, L, G, F, M.
Square 4: Work 1 rnd each with I, C, M, J, D, A.
Square 5: Work 1 rnd each with L, K, H, A, C, F.
Square 6: Work 1 rnd each with I, H, E, N, J, B.
Square 7: Work 1 rnd each with E, F, D, A, G, K.
Square 8: Work 1 rnd each with K, B, F, M, C, L.
Square 9: Work 1 rnd each with G, M, K, D, A, B.
Square 10: Work 1 rnd each with L, G, A, J, H, M.
Square 11: Work 1 rnd each with A, L, J, E, F, D.
Square 12: Work 1 rnd each with C, I, D, K, A, G.
Square 13: Work 1 rnd each with J, M, G, H, B, I.
Square 14: Work 1 rnd each with D, F, N, B, J, H.
Square 15: Work 1 rnd each with J, D, C, L, G, E.
Square 16:Work 1 rnd each with M, B, J, K, H, N.

GRANNY SQUARE
Ch 4; join with sl st in first ch to form a ring.
Rnd 1 (RS): Ch 3 (counts as first dc in this rnd and in all following rnds), 2 dc in ring, ch 2, (3 dc in ring, ch 2) 3 times; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 12 dc and 4 ch-2 sps at the end of this rnd. Fasten off.
Rnd 2: With RS facing, join next color with sl st in any ch-2 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in same ch-2 sp (corner made), ch 1, *(3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp (corner made), ch 1; rep from * 2 more times; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 4 corners at the end of this rnd. Fasten off.
Rnd 3: With RS facing, join next color with sl st in any corner ch-2 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in same ch-2 sp, ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, *(3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1; rep from * 2 more times; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 4 corners and one 3-dc group on each side. Fasten off.
Rnd 4: With RS facing, join next color with sl st in any corner ch-2 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in same ch-2 sp, (ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp) twice, ch 1, *(3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, (ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp) twice, ch 1; rep from * 2 more times; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 4 corners and two 3-dc groups on each side. Fasten off.
Rnd 5: With RS facing, join next color with sl st in any corner ch-2 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in same ch-2 sp, ch 1, (3 dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) to next corner ch-2 sp, *(3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, (3 dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) to next corner ch-2 sp; rep from * 2 more times; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 4 corners and three 3-dc groups on each side. Fasten off.
Rnd 6: With last color, rep Rnd 5 - 4 corners and four 3-dc groups on each side.
Fasten off.

FINISHING
Sew Squares in order, from Square 1 to Square 16, into a strip 6 1/2 x 104 in. (16.5 x 264 cm) long.
Border
Join H with sl st anywhere along outside edge of Scarf; ch 1, sc evenly around outside edge of Scarf, working 3 sc in each corner; join with sl st in first st.
Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Saturday, 24 May 2014

Edinburgh Tartan Wrap–Crochet Pattern

 

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Get the pattern here.

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Inspired by all things tartan and especially the Edinburgh Festival and Tattoo. I’m delighted with how it resembles woven tartan fabric.
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Friday, 23 May 2014

Picnic Granny Square Blankets

Nice and bright fresh springtime colours and perfect for picnics.

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Thursday, 22 May 2014

Crochet Mandalas

I have been working on this circular blanket for the past couple of days and am now in the process of blocking it.

Circular blankets like these are often referred to as Mandalas.

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The pattern or tutorial for this blanket can be found over at Crochet with Raymond.

Mandala

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thangka painting of Vajradhatu Mandala

Maṇḍala (मण्डल) is a Sanskrit word meaning "circle." In the Buddhist and Hindureligious traditions their sacred art often takes a mandala form. The basic form of most Hindu and Buddhist mandalas is a square with four gates containing a circle with a center point. Each gate is in the shape of a T.[1][2] Mandalas often exhibit radial balance.[3]

These mandalas, concentric diagrams, have spiritual and ritual significance in bothBuddhism and Hinduism.[4][5] The term is of Hindu origin and appears in the Rig Vedaas the name of the sections of the work, but is also used in other Indian religions, particularly Buddhism. In the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism, mandalas have been developed into sandpainting. They are also a key part of anuttarayoga tantrameditation practices.

In various spiritual traditions, mandalas may be employed for focusing attention of aspirants and adepts, as a spiritual teaching tool, for establishing a sacred space, and as an aid to meditation and trance induction. According to the psychologistDavid Fontana, its symbolic nature can help one "to access progressively deeper levels of the unconscious, ultimately assisting the meditator to experience a mystical sense of oneness with the ultimate unity from which the cosmos in all its manifold forms arises."[6] The psychoanalyst Carl Jung saw the mandala as "a representation of the unconscious self,"[citation needed] and believed his paintings of mandalas enabled him to identify emotional disorders and work towards wholenessin personality.[7]

In common use, mandala has become a generic term for any plan, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically, amicrocosm of the Universe from the human perspective.[